AFM Church Articles

A Catechism of Pentecostal Church Schisms in Zimbabwe by Dr Nathan Nhira

A CATECHISM OF PENTECOSTAL CHURCH SCHISMS IN ZIMBABWE: A LEADERSHIP
Read More
A Catechism of Pentecostal Church Schisms in Zimbabwe by Dr Nathan Nhira

The Profile: Overseer JT Nzombe (AFM Chivhu Province)

Overseer Joshua Takawira Nzombe The Provincial Chairman who has steered the
Read More
The Profile: Overseer JT Nzombe (AFM Chivhu Province)

Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo

Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo Dr  Clever Gomba  Introduction This article traces the coming of Apostolic Faith Mission in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo. This topic is tainted with many hypothesis and versions. The researcher had to do a synopsis of many version and oral traditions revision in gathering the relevant information in the quest to answer the question; how AFM did came to Bulawayo. Several thesis are explained in this article with the intention of giving readers the chance to come up with their own conclusions.  From the writer’s perspective the Gobatema thesis fairly account for the coming of AFM to Bulawayo. Existing empirical evidences in sources such as the chronicle, court proceedings of 1914-1917, clearly outlines that AFM came to Bulawayo as early as 1913. From the writer’s judgement most existing oral traditions in Bulawayo about the coming of AFM to Bulawayo are fraught with dominant narratives, and only account for the post 1940 era.  Research indicates AFM was already in Bulawayo 27 years before 1940, hence the writer of this article thoroughly focused on the first 25 years of AFM in Bulawayo. This is a heavily edited document due to limited space in the AFM news, otherwise this document is supposed to be more than 43 pages, but a number of Narratives have been left out and concentrate on those the writer assumes to be useful as of now. Most interviews conducted are not captured; most pictures were intentionally left out. Some will be included in the later editions of publication. Methodology The three tools of data collection employed provided relevant data to achieve the goals of this study; which are document analysis; interviews and site visit to Gobadema in 2013. The researcher conducted textual analysis of the main newspaper in Bulawayo chronicle which has been in existence for 126 years, church magazines, newspaper articles from the following papers and book namely: Missiorama ( an AFM Bulletin in the early years of AFM in South Africa);, The Apostolic Faith, Books such as The Fire Falls in Africa by Isak Burger & Marius Nel (History of AFM of South Africa); Lindsay book: Sketches from the life & Ministry of John G Lake; Another book by Lindsay- John G Lake-Apostle to Africa. Another landmark source is the article by Enocent Msindo from Rhodes University, its titled; Ethnicity, not Class? The 1929 Bulawayo Faction Fights Reconsidered* published in Journal of Southern African Studies, Vol. 32, No. 3 (Sep., 2006), pp. 429-447Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.(Rhodes University)The data gathered from documents was compared with data already gathered from other online sources. The research used different sources of data so as to elicit as much as possible for the study. This helped a lot because the research would not have been to this standard had it been that a single research method was used. It must be noted as this point that documents and textual analysis heavily relies on the experience of the researcher and his ability to objectively interpret data. Class discussions on the profile of John Graham Lake provided insightful contribution from the students at Azusa Theological Seminary where this researcher is a lecturer for Charismatic & Pentecostal Theology. The methodological limitations of documentary review and analysis was reduced by using multiple research approaches (triangulation). Historical Narratives of the coming of AFM to Bulawayo The researcher also tasked students from Living Waters Theological Seminary, Azusa Campus, Campus, class of 2014 to do research in groups on the origins of AFM in Bulawayo. This task was done under the subject, the History of AFM. The results of the student research were fascinating, and insightful. The research findings laid the base and framework of this article. The major weakness of the student findings was that, most of the claims of the narratives were based on oral history, and focusing on the post 1940s as the starting point in the coming of AFM to Bulawayo. After further research the writer of this article realised that the view that AFM came to Bulawayo in late 1930s, and early 1940s was faulty and not only faulty but incorrect due to the further findings explained below. The majority of students relied mainly on what this writer labelled the JS Source to explain the coming of AFM to Bulawayo, but further research by this writer conclusively identified that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is sketchily related to the JS Source. The JS Source account for post 1940, without laying the foundational explanation of the early years. To feel the gap of the JS source, the writer had to look for alternative explanations, and identified the following thesis to explain the origins of AFM in Bulawayo: The Gobatema narrative, Shona migrant narrative; Paulos Bulawayo narrative, Missionary narrative; The JS Narrative. It is important to point out that there are other narratives which the researcher is still assessing but which were not ready for publication due to time limitations. These narratives are: The Kalanga narrative where a man called Mantshontsho from Plumtree, under chief Mafindo received the gospel of John Graham Lake and was baptised in the holy Spirit and came to Bulawayo through Botswana to preach to the locals. He arrived in Bulawayo in 1914, and established a ‘cell group’ of AFM members in Railway Compound. He was believed to be gifted in healing and interpreting toungues. He was accused of ‘breaking the hearts of the ancestors’ through his preachings. The Gobatema Narrative The researcher realised that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is closed linked to the establishment of AFM in Matebeleland South. Hence in this section the writer is going to focus on the Gobatema narrative. This view was once published in one of the AFM News magazine in 2013. The writer of this view firmly concludes that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo stretches back to as early as 1915. Some of the names which were instrumental in Gwanda region as early as 1914-1917, are indicated in Missorama as also key in preaching escapades in Hwange as early as 1914-1917. How could preachers pass Bulawayo proceeding to Hwange without preaching in Bulawayo. Considering Bulawayo’s strategic positioning as the regional capital city, and influx of people from all regions in Matabeleland. There is no satisfying explanation to that gap. The people of Shashe, Nhwali Gungwe, Tshongwe, Ntepe; Nzenya; Zezani; Malibeng, Swereki; Machuchuta (All these places are in Matabeleland South) went to South Africa for work between 1905 -1913; some were taken in contracts through the government to work in mines, farms. The contracts could be for six months or a year. These people went to work in South Africa because in their country Rhodesia now Zimbabwe people were earning 50cents, $1 to $2 yet in South Africa people earned around $10 a month or more between 1905 and 1913. It is where people attended the crusades or revivals of John Graham Lake and Thomas Hezmalhalch in 1908. The other reasons why people went to South Africa during this time was raise funds to Lobola. They attended the crusades in Joburg, they would leave their places after work on Friday afternoon and take a train from Messina, Polokwane, Petersburg and reach Jorburg in the morning and attend the services of John Graham Lake on Saturday and Sunday; after the services they would return to their workplaces and arriving Monday mornings. During Christmas and New Year they returned to their country Rhodesia mainly in 1908 and start preaching to their people. Some interview findings indicate that it is these people that brought the fire of the gospel during those times and many people gave their lives to Christ but there was no one to baptise them and the people went back to South Africa and reported the news to missionaries that many people repented in Rhodesia and one of the locals was send to baptise people back in Rhodesia (between 1910-1911). Then Isaka Zacharia Manamela came through Shashe at the Limpopo river banks, Mashabanze; Mpangamadi between 1910-1913. Manamela came under the Dugmore Outreach Ministries. This Narrative indicates that AFM was already in Matebeleland South by the Christmas of 1908 by migrant workers who were coming back for Christmas in 1908.    The above houses  at Gobatema Mission, with an ingraving inside which indicate that one of the Missionery Dugmore Arrived at this place in 1912, before being followed by Golden in 1913 with the grave indicated later in this article.The collapsed picture is for a classroom. Dugmore was following on Zacharia Manamela who had crossed the Limpopo earlier to Matabeleland It is reported that the first church was founded at Mpangamadi at a home of Lukas Mathokwa in 1910; he was a Sotho person whose home land was Botswana.  Some of the first converts were: Petros Mushambo; Titus Mudeme, Jonas Mudeme, Matsethu family, Mudida, Lukas Mathokwa remained leading the base branch as Zachariah Manamela proceeded to other places such as Swereki; Maliberg, Nhwali; Dendele; Butulula; Zezani; Sukwi and the other people baptised during this time were Komiki Tshuma; Majaunda family; Kibe; Muleya family Siwela Samson; Nalana Ncube.   Some of the first converts were baptised on this section of the river in Gwanda, 1913. Oral tradition claims the crocodiles moved from the water when the preacher was still preaching to the converts. This claim could not be authenticated though       One of the early baptism pool in Gobatema, which remains intact up to this day. All the walls of the building collapsed to the ground but this section of the building, the baptism pool remains intact with its polishings. Thousands were baptised in this pool. Manamela proceeded to Ntepe at later stage after Mpangamadi branch establishment; Tshongwe; Gungwe during Chief Nhlamba Ndovu’s rulership. He was preaching from the book of Leviticus mainly chapter 11, mainly about foods which are clean and unclean eg rabbits, caterpillars (madora- this was a delicious food in Matabeleland), he was later reported to the chief for teaching wrong doctrine to people and refusing them to eat caterpillars/madora and was arrested and later released and he continued to Northern Rhodesia Zambia and Malawi. He baptised people from Shashe to Ntepe. Manamela was the first to stay at Gobatema Mission before it was bought; he later proceeded to Zambia with the gospel. During the stay of Isaka Zacharia Manamela at Gobatema his first key converts were: Paulos Mbulawa ‘Siteba’; Joseph Madumejah; Johans Siphali; Pailos Ndebele; Maria Ndebele; Isaiah Mabanga.  He proceeded to Zambia; & Malawi with his wife preaching the gospel. Missionery Golden (Godadi) came to Ntepe trying to trace Isaka Zachariah Manamela and was told that he has gone to Zambia and Malawi (Nyasaland). The grave of Golden is still there at Ntepe up to this day. The researcher had the opportunity to visit the place to validate the claim, the picture of the grave is indicated later in the article. Most of the key families mentioned above had many relatives and friends already working in Bulawayo farms, mines and industry as early as 1898, after the first Chimurenga. There was an influx of migrant workers from South Africa back to Bulawayo, nearer home. Most of these had received the gospel in South Africa. The gobatema  narratives emphasizes the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is directly linked to Gobatema Mission, gatherings of AFM members in Bulawayo started as early as 1913 but there was no clear governance system to link them to missionaries in South Africa. The Missorama News of 1916:8 states; “the gospel is spreading like fire in Southern Rhodesia, many natives are found gathering in Bulawayo, in townships  propagating the four squire gospel of John Graham Lake” The missorama clearly states most of the coordinators of township gatherings were baptised in the Holy Spirit between 1908-1913 through John Graham Lake preaching in South Africa. In the 1917 Missorama publication, a man called Madumejah was on fire for Christ, always seen preaching in the natives townships, and this man was described as a returnee from South Africa. Madumejah had many followers of John Graham Lake gospel of Holy Spirit baptism evidenced by tongues. His major challenge is he was not recognized by Missionaries because he was black, he was expected to work under a white person. And due lack of training most of these gatherings could split in many breakaway sub groups. Issues of polygamy, prophecy and money caused most of the splits as early as 1917. Initially, most apostolic and Zionist movements emerged from this time. The second great breakaway and splits in AFM were experience between 1929-1943. Most of the splits of this time were caused by polygamy issues, prophecy and particular doctrinal teachings. Shona “Manyika’ narrative This narrative is linked to Isaac Chiwaka who came from Manicaland, went to South Africa in 1908, met John Graham Lake and was baptised with the Holy Spirit and later moved to Bulawayo in 1911 and started preaching to railway compound in Bulawayo in 1913 and many converts joined AFM. Chiwaka was liked by white people for preaching the gospel to the ‘indigenous’ community in Bulawayo. A bit of background for Bulawayo is necessary at this stage. The influx of 'foreign' labour saw earlier Shona arrivals (also foreigners to Bulawayo) and non-Rhodesian migrants becoming the 'owners' of Bulawayo, as their presence predated the birth of Ndebele activism. These residents defined the moral, linguistic and social tone of Bulawayo. By 1910, the Bulawayo 'alien' African population had risen to 25,086 from 11,359 in 1906 who included Ndebele, Kalanga and others from Matabeleland were still outnumbered, only increasing from 6,345 in 1906 to 12,739 in 1910. There were of course, apart from Ndebele workers, a few prominent Ndebele inhabitants in town, some of whom were born in the location, such as the Manyobas (including Siphambaniso Manyoba, who became a prominent Ndebele activist after 1929), and others, such as Jojo Mkatjane, originally from the Shangani, who by 1930 appeared to have lost touch with home. There were also remnants of Lobengula's family, such as Queen Moho, who usually housed visitors from the royal family when they came to town; and the children of Muntu (Lobengula's brother), who deserted their father when he became a pauper in Bulilima-Mangwe and went to Bulawayo for 'immorality'. To this number should be added a few local women already living in Bulawayo by 1897, which the Native Commissioner Malema stereotyped as 'prostitutes', whereas some, on the contrary, formed a reasonably prosperous class of women who made money from leasing their properties to urban male workers. By then, Bulawayo had a 'more than adequate' labour provision, with a 'large floating population' wandering between all the principal centres of employment. Early settlers of urban Bulawayo were in different senses both 'cosmopolitan' and 'ethnic'. They interacted freely at workplaces through a created convenient medium of communication, Lapalapa (also called Kitchen Kaffir), which was a mixture of numerous languages and 'broken' English. Lapalapa, viewed by contemporary employers as a language 'adequate for the ordinary purposes of life', was respected as an emergent language that, according to Tudor Trevor, 'spreads from Durban to the Congo, and in almost every kraal someone can be found to understand it'. The first preachers used used lapalapa to convey the gospel in Bulawayo. Isaac Chikawa from Manicaland, a Shona and an employee who had lived in Bulawayo from 1913-1929 is regarded as one key AFM member who came from south Africa with Pentecostal message in Bulawayo in 1913. He was badly injured when there was a tribal fight in December 1929 in Bulawayo. His account is indicated below (Msendo, 2006) “I heard a crowd of Matabele natives passing through my house in the Location on Thursday night last, 26th December 1929, saying they were looking for the Manyika natives, mainly the preacher of AFM. I had not then seen any of the Manyika natives looking or fighting with the Matabeles. About 11 pm on Friday night last, the 27th December 1929, a crowd of Matabele, Blantyre and Mlozi natives came to my hut, asked my name and tribe, and then asked me if I had any Manyika natives in my hut, because they wanted to kill them. Some of them searched the dining room and then went away, telling me to lock the door”Chronicle, 28 Dec 1929 Another key person in the preaching of AFM message indicated a Shona victim of the attack on the Railway Compound violence of 1929, Mtero a manyika, a crippled storekeeper who lost 21 pounds  in cash and goods.  When his property was burnt while he was in hiding. So rich a man could not have been a newcomer to Bulawayo. Evidence from The Chronicle, indicate Mtero was leading some group which was speaking in another ‘funny’ language during their service claiming that they were under the spirit. Apart from living in company accommodation - the Railway Compound - he had valuable possessions. The Ndebele and 'aliens' who raided the Railway Compound, where about 300 to 400 working Manyika (a Shona group) lived, gathered and burnt between 'nine or ten huge piles' of clothes, the then prestigious items such as bicycles (which obviously loafers and poor urban newcomers could not afford to buy) and other belongings. They then drove Shona out of the compound. This group of manyikas was identified as peddling missionary teachings in Bulawayo. This foreign religion was believed to anger the indigenous gods. The name AFM linked to John Graham Lake clearly appear in the chronicle newspaper daily edition on 1928 and 1929, being linked also to the tribal violence on the eve of Christmas of 1929 The violence in Bulawayo on the Christmas of 1929 as reported in Chronicle indicate that AFM was already in Zimbabwe for years before 1929, but probably it lacked missionary linkages to ratify its operations. It needs to be noted here that the gatherings of AFM members as early as these years were heavily tribalized and racialized. Tribal origin should only serve as biographic data, unfortunately Africa is highly polarized because of this factor. Paulos Mbulawa narrative This view is linked to Gobatema narrative in that Paulos Mbulawa who is popularized in later versions of AFM coming to Bulawayo was born in Gwanda in 1894. The missorama magazine presents pictures of this man with his wife in many editions. He is pictured as early as 1916 described as a key preacher in Matabeleland. This is the man who is believed to have played a key role in bringing AFM to Bulawayo. The only challenge with this narrative is that it indicates that he started preaching in Bulawayo in the mid 1930s. The dating of his arrival is highly faulty to accord him that status because other existing sources indicate that AFM was already in Bulawayo many years before his arrival. Other views argue that it depends with the section of the groupings he worked with, since the gatherings were highly tribalized. Also his ordination certificate only indicates that he was only ordained in 1947. This means he preached for more than 25 years before his ordination. Records indicate he started preaching in 1916, he was pictured in Missorama magazine with his wife in 1916, described as a powerful preacher in the magazine. Also a copy of his passport verifies that he was born in 1894. The Missionary narrative This views stresses that AFM was bought to Bulawayo by white missionaries as early as 1913.  This view is supported by the chronicle of June 1914, found at the library of Chronicle newspaper in Bulawayo. It indicates the Missionery Golden used to come to preach in Bulawayo between 1913 and 1917. This missionary was based in Gwanda, Gobatema mission but he would often travel to preach in Bulawayo, Zvishavane and Beitbridge. Even his death is recorded in the Chronicle on 1917. His grave is in Gwanda at Ntepe up to this day. Former Overseer for AFM Rev Musinyali has recently plastered the grave and well prepare the grave site as indicated in the picture below. The missionary narrative weakneses is that if focus on the work of missioneries at the expense of the black players. Events and activities are centred on the missionary at the expense of the local players. Some sources indicated that some missioneries who came to Zimbabwe under the flagship of AFM ended up pursuing their own ministries and abandoned the intended purpose     The Grave of one of the first Missionaries, Golden who died in 1917, and was buried in Ntepe, Gwanda The JS Source narrative The JS source is relevant in the establishment of AFM in Bulawayo from the 1940, and predominantly in the 1950s onwards. In research context the time after 1940 is not much of a debate because the majority of people who participated in this era still surviving. The coming of AFM to Bulawayo is not clearly accounted on the time before 1940. Existing empirical evidence shows that the establishment of AFM in Bulawayo stretches back to years prior to 1915. Clear newspapers reports in the chronicle, Missorama are laudable about AFM establishment in early years prior to 1915. The JS source lacks multiple narratives; it heavily uses dominant narrative in its historiography. It lacks the institutionalization of AFM but traces more on particular individuals besides the fact that AFM was 40 years in existence at the time of JS source Narrative. The JS source also lacks written supporting evidence of that time. The JS Source outlines the gatherings under a tree near Bulawayo Amphitheatre, movement to a venue in Queenspark, again near Mpilo, and related avenues. This thesis has been refuted by the Chronicle reports of 1949, which indicate that there were skirmishes in AFM Bulawayo as early as 1932, where congregations were gathering on tribal bases. Hence the JS source simple narrates the gatherings of one of the congregation among many and it cannot be taken to universally explain how AFM came to Bulawayo. In the initial stages, AFM members met at Apostolic Faith Church in Makokoba. The Church was built and commissioned in 1939. It is not clear as to exactly which year AFM members began to meet at that Church. However some sort of structures were evident in 1955 when Elder Stonken was baptized, being the first to be baptized, by Rev Paulos Mbulawa from Gwanda. At this time, formal meetings were converned at Mutsamvi Tree and Mr Timothy Josiah had been sent to Kasupe Bible School in Zambia. It is said that at that time Rev Paulos Mbulawa and Rev Kantor were put in charge of that Bulawayo project, meaning to say that all Bulawayo affairs were run from Gobatema. Accoding to JS narrative there are many different venues that AFM used since the early stages. Due to lack of organization and poor financial stamina, AFM initially would meet under trees. A venue that many (Mrs Manatsa, Elder Jerico Muchineripi and Gogo  Madawo) agreed to in the early 1940s is at the Apostolic Faith Church (see picture) along Church Street in Makokoba, one of the oldest African Residential locations of the city. A label inside the church assets that Apostolic Faith Church was founded by Rev W.O Hutchinson in 1908 and according to the stone engraving in the entrance area, the assembly church was built and commissioned by Pastor C.J. Hitchcock on 12 August 1939. It is said that members of AFM, others who had come from different parts of the country where AFM had established, including Kadoma, came to this church thinking that it was an AFM affiliate. The resident leader at the time was Pastor Kachembere. After noticing traces of doctrinal disparities including handling of prophecy, members of AFM silently pulled out. Elder Jerico Muchineripi here then differs with the rest of the resources persons when he says that around 1955, they moved out of Apostolic Faith Church to a tree in the Park area east of the city and here is the tree. A tree in the Park east of the city said to have been an early venue for church services From here, Elder Jerico professes that they left the tree after being accused by the then white local government of noise and encroaching. The white community did not welcome them using a tree in the well nursed Park area. Elder Jerico says that no one was arrested but they were just asked to leave. The Church then headed for another tree at Queenspark East just across Zimbabwe Saints Club. The tree is said to have been uprooted but Elder Jerico could easily identify the location. The following picture shows the place.   Location where a tree used as a venue for Church services at Queenspark East. It is said to have been uprooted. The Church did not meet here at Queenspark for long. Elder Jerico put it at not more than a year. It is said that they sent Mr Tavonga to Kadoma to deliberate on the venue issue. A phone call was made to the AFM white only church at Northend and a Mr Jockman came with a message that a new venue was found for them to congregate between Mpilo Hospital and now Westpark Cemetary. The place was owned by a wealthy white man called Greenspan. The church then began to assemble there under a tree. It is said that an old bus was by the side of the tree in which, in the event of bad weather, they would go in and continue with their Service. The following tree was shown by Elder Jerico and his wife (seen with a walking stick in the picture). However in our interview with Gogo Manatsa, she remembers that it was a big Mopani Tree yet Elder Jerico showed me a tree that is not a Mopani. Within the vicinity there is no old big Mopani except for a smaller and younger one near the tree that I was shown. Church services were convened under this tree at Greenspan according to Elder Jerico. It is also said that midweek services during the same time were convened at the late Rev Peter Manatsa’s residential place in Mzilikazi at No. J76. The Manatsas’ Residence where mid-week services were done according to Mrs Manatsa and Elder Stonken. It is also said that while at Greenspan, they chose another tree where the Board of Elders would regularly meet for formal Board meetings.   The Mutsamvi tree in Mpilo Hospital vicinity used as venue for Formal Board of Elders Meetings Some of the leaders who met under the Mutsamvi Tree for meetings were Aaron Dube Madawo, who later became one of the most influential leaders of that time,  Jerico Muchineripi, Muvhami, Mapfumo, Timothy Josiah and Peter Manatsa according to Gogo Manatsa. Under the same tree in the early 1960s leadership deliberated on acquiring a Church stand where they could sustainably accommodate the growing numbers of sainthood. No. 9759 Matshobane, which was a club, was bought and a structure was built with most of the contributions from Gwanda. It was completed and commissioned in 1963. Apart from Pastors Kantor and Paulos.Mbulawa who came from Gwanda to monitor and administer sacraments such as water Baptism and Holy Communion, the church in Bulawayo did not have trained leaders. Men that came together and chose amongst themselves who may lead soon after leaving Apostolic Faith Church were, according to Elder Jerico and Mrs Manatsa and Mrs Madawo, early membership comprised of Aaron Dube Madawo, Muvhami, Mapfumo, Jerico Muchineripi, Manatsa, Tavonga, Timothy Josiah, Tavonga, Samuel Jackson. All of them were equal in role until they sat down to elect leadership. It needs to be emphasized here that, The JS Source presents a detailed view of the growth of AFM in Bulawayo, but not its birth and origins. Hence the JS Source is relevant for later stages of AFM in Bulawayo Conclusion  The writer concludes that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is not a linear story but it is full of contrasting trajectories and trends.  This article simply serves as an insightful synthesis to inspire further research on the broader history of AFM in Zimbabwe. I would like to also thank all who actively participated in this research, particularly the third year class of Azusa campus. They raised insightful and critical questions in my lectures on this subject and it has challenged me to continuously research to increase the internal and external validity on this topic. This article is an extract from the book the writer is in the process of writing: Trajectories of The Early Years of AFM in Zimbabwe, 1908-1930.    Sources Used  *** most on the information in this article is based on primary data, on the research trip made by Azusa Campus Class of 2013 in Gobatema Gwanda Ethnicity, not Class? The 1929 Bulawayo Faction Fights Reconsidered* published in Journal of Southern African Studies, Vol. 32, No. 3 (Sep., 2006), pp. 429-447Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.(Rhodes University) Missiorama News an AFM Bulletin in the early years of AFM in South Africa, 1916 Interview of Elder Ntengo Nyathi 07 Oct 2013 Interview with Elder Muchineripi 08 October 2013 Interview Overseer Mlauzi In Gwanda 2013, 21 Oct 
Read More
Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo
A Catechism of Pentecostal Church Schisms in Zimbabwe by Dr Nathan Nhira
AFM Church Articles

A Catechism of Pentecostal Church Schisms in Zimbabwe by Dr Nathan Nhira

A CATECHISM OF PENTECOSTAL CHURCH SCHISMS IN ZIMBABWE: A LEADERSHIP CRISIS PARADOX DR. NATHAN NHIRA Management School Christ University, Bangalore, India ndnhira@gmail.com Co-Authors :Professor Harold Andrew Patrick, Christ University, Bangalore,...
Read More
The Profile: Overseer JT Nzombe (AFM Chivhu Province)
AFM Church Articles

The Profile: Overseer JT Nzombe (AFM Chivhu Province)

Overseer Joshua Takawira Nzombe The Provincial Chairman who has steered the province from its inception. A humble servant of the Lord who is also billed to preach at Rufaro General...
Read More
Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo
AFM Church Articles

Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo

Trajectories of the coming of AFM in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo Dr  Clever Gomba  Introduction This article traces the coming of Apostolic Faith Mission in Zimbabwe to Bulawayo. This topic is tainted with many hypothesis and versions. The researcher had to do a synopsis of many version and oral traditions revision in gathering the relevant information in the quest to answer the question; how AFM did came to Bulawayo. Several thesis are explained in this article with the intention of giving readers the chance to come up with their own conclusions.  From the writer’s perspective the Gobatema thesis fairly account for the coming of AFM to Bulawayo. Existing empirical evidences in sources such as the chronicle, court proceedings of 1914-1917, clearly outlines that AFM came to Bulawayo as early as 1913. From the writer’s judgement most existing oral traditions in Bulawayo about the coming of AFM to Bulawayo are fraught with dominant narratives, and only account for the post 1940 era.  Research indicates AFM was already in Bulawayo 27 years before 1940, hence the writer of this article thoroughly focused on the first 25 years of AFM in Bulawayo. This is a heavily edited document due to limited space in the AFM news, otherwise this document is supposed to be more than 43 pages, but a number of Narratives have been left out and concentrate on those the writer assumes to be useful as of now. Most interviews conducted are not captured; most pictures were intentionally left out. Some will be included in the later editions of publication. Methodology The three tools of data collection employed provided relevant data to achieve the goals of this study; which are document analysis; interviews and site visit to Gobadema in 2013. The researcher conducted textual analysis of the main newspaper in Bulawayo chronicle which has been in existence for 126 years, church magazines, newspaper articles from the following papers and book namely: Missiorama ( an AFM Bulletin in the early years of AFM in South Africa);, The Apostolic Faith, Books such as The Fire Falls in Africa by Isak Burger & Marius Nel (History of AFM of South Africa); Lindsay book: Sketches from the life & Ministry of John G Lake; Another book by Lindsay- John G Lake-Apostle to Africa. Another landmark source is the article by Enocent Msindo from Rhodes University, its titled; Ethnicity, not Class? The 1929 Bulawayo Faction Fights Reconsidered* published in Journal of Southern African Studies, Vol. 32, No. 3 (Sep., 2006), pp. 429-447Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.(Rhodes University)The data gathered from documents was compared with data already gathered from other online sources. The research used different sources of data so as to elicit as much as possible for the study. This helped a lot because the research would not have been to this standard had it been that a single research method was used. It must be noted as this point that documents and textual analysis heavily relies on the experience of the researcher and his ability to objectively interpret data. Class discussions on the profile of John Graham Lake provided insightful contribution from the students at Azusa Theological Seminary where this researcher is a lecturer for Charismatic & Pentecostal Theology. The methodological limitations of documentary review and analysis was reduced by using multiple research approaches (triangulation). Historical Narratives of the coming of AFM to Bulawayo The researcher also tasked students from Living Waters Theological Seminary, Azusa Campus, Campus, class of 2014 to do research in groups on the origins of AFM in Bulawayo. This task was done under the subject, the History of AFM. The results of the student research were fascinating, and insightful. The research findings laid the base and framework of this article. The major weakness of the student findings was that, most of the claims of the narratives were based on oral history, and focusing on the post 1940s as the starting point in the coming of AFM to Bulawayo. After further research the writer of this article realised that the view that AFM came to Bulawayo in late 1930s, and early 1940s was faulty and not only faulty but incorrect due to the further findings explained below. The majority of students relied mainly on what this writer labelled the JS Source to explain the coming of AFM to Bulawayo, but further research by this writer conclusively identified that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is sketchily related to the JS Source. The JS Source account for post 1940, without laying the foundational explanation of the early years. To feel the gap of the JS source, the writer had to look for alternative explanations, and identified the following thesis to explain the origins of AFM in Bulawayo: The Gobatema narrative, Shona migrant narrative; Paulos Bulawayo narrative, Missionary narrative; The JS Narrative. It is important to point out that there are other narratives which the researcher is still assessing but which were not ready for publication due to time limitations. These narratives are: The Kalanga narrative where a man called Mantshontsho from Plumtree, under chief Mafindo received the gospel of John Graham Lake and was baptised in the holy Spirit and came to Bulawayo through Botswana to preach to the locals. He arrived in Bulawayo in 1914, and established a ‘cell group’ of AFM members in Railway Compound. He was believed to be gifted in healing and interpreting toungues. He was accused of ‘breaking the hearts of the ancestors’ through his preachings. The Gobatema Narrative The researcher realised that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is closed linked to the establishment of AFM in Matebeleland South. Hence in this section the writer is going to focus on the Gobatema narrative. This view was once published in one of the AFM News magazine in 2013. The writer of this view firmly concludes that the coming of AFM to Bulawayo stretches back to as early as 1915. Some of the names which were instrumental in Gwanda region as early as 1914-1917, are indicated in Missorama as also key in preaching escapades in Hwange as early as 1914-1917. How could preachers pass Bulawayo proceeding to Hwange without preaching in Bulawayo. Considering Bulawayo’s strategic positioning as the regional capital city, and influx of people from all regions in Matabeleland. There is no satisfying explanation to that gap. The people of Shashe, Nhwali Gungwe, Tshongwe, Ntepe; Nzenya; Zezani; Malibeng, Swereki; Machuchuta (All these places are in Matabeleland South) went to South Africa for work between 1905 -1913; some were taken in contracts through the government to work in mines, farms. The contracts could be for six months or a year. These people went to work in South Africa because in their country Rhodesia now Zimbabwe people were earning 50cents, $1 to $2 yet in South Africa people earned around $10 a month or more between 1905 and 1913. It is where people attended the crusades or revivals of John Graham Lake and Thomas Hezmalhalch in 1908. The other reasons why people went to South Africa during this time was raise funds to Lobola. They attended the crusades in Joburg, they would leave their places after work on Friday afternoon and take a train from Messina, Polokwane, Petersburg and reach Jorburg in the morning and attend the services of John Graham Lake on Saturday and Sunday; after the services they would return to their workplaces and arriving Monday mornings. During Christmas and New Year they returned to their country Rhodesia mainly in 1908 and start preaching to their people. Some interview findings indicate that it is these people that brought the fire of the gospel during those times and many people gave their lives to Christ but there was no one to baptise them and the people went back to South Africa and reported the news to missionaries that many people repented in Rhodesia and one of the locals was send to baptise people back in Rhodesia (between 1910-1911). Then Isaka Zacharia Manamela came through Shashe at the Limpopo river banks, Mashabanze; Mpangamadi between 1910-1913. Manamela came under the Dugmore Outreach Ministries. This Narrative indicates that AFM was already in Matebeleland South by the Christmas of 1908 by migrant workers who were coming back for Christmas in 1908.    The above houses  at Gobatema Mission, with an ingraving inside which indicate that one of the Missionery Dugmore Arrived at this place in 1912, before being followed by Golden in 1913 with the grave indicated later in this article.The collapsed picture is for a classroom. Dugmore was following on Zacharia Manamela who had crossed the Limpopo earlier to Matabeleland It is reported that the first church was founded at Mpangamadi at a home of Lukas Mathokwa in 1910; he was a Sotho person whose home land was Botswana.  Some of the first converts were: Petros Mushambo; Titus Mudeme, Jonas Mudeme, Matsethu family, Mudida, Lukas Mathokwa remained leading the base branch as Zachariah Manamela proceeded to other places such as Swereki; Maliberg, Nhwali; Dendele; Butulula; Zezani; Sukwi and the other people baptised during this time were Komiki Tshuma; Majaunda family; Kibe; Muleya family Siwela Samson; Nalana Ncube.   Some of the first converts were baptised on this section of the river in Gwanda, 1913. Oral tradition claims the crocodiles moved from the water when the preacher was still preaching to the converts. This claim could not be authenticated though       One of the early baptism pool in Gobatema, which remains intact up to this day. All the walls of the building collapsed to the ground but this section of the building, the baptism pool remains intact with its polishings. Thousands were baptised in this pool. Manamela proceeded to Ntepe at later stage after Mpangamadi branch establishment; Tshongwe; Gungwe during Chief Nhlamba Ndovu’s rulership. He was preaching from the book of Leviticus mainly chapter 11, mainly about foods which are clean and unclean eg rabbits, caterpillars (madora- this was a delicious food in Matabeleland), he was later reported to the chief for teaching wrong doctrine to people and refusing them to eat caterpillars/madora and was arrested and later released and he continued to Northern Rhodesia Zambia and Malawi. He baptised people from Shashe to Ntepe. Manamela was the first to stay at Gobatema Mission before it was bought; he later proceeded to Zambia with the gospel. During the stay of Isaka Zacharia Manamela at Gobatema his first key converts were: Paulos Mbulawa ‘Siteba’; Joseph Madumejah; Johans Siphali; Pailos Ndebele; Maria Ndebele; Isaiah Mabanga.  He proceeded to Zambia; & Malawi with his wife preaching the gospel. Missionery Golden (Godadi) came to Ntepe trying to trace Isaka Zachariah Manamela and was told that he has gone to Zambia and Malawi (Nyasaland). The grave of Golden is still there at Ntepe up to this day. The researcher had the opportunity to visit the place to validate the claim, the picture of the grave is indicated later in the article. Most of the key families mentioned above had many relatives and friends already working in Bulawayo farms, mines and industry as early as 1898, after the first Chimurenga. There was an influx of migrant workers from South Africa back to Bulawayo, nearer home. Most of these had received the gospel in South Africa. The gobatema  narratives emphasizes the coming of AFM to Bulawayo is directly linked to Gobatema Mission, gatherings of AFM members in Bulawayo started as early as 1913 but there was no clear governance system to link them to missionaries in South Africa. The Missorama News of 1916:8 states; “the gospel is spreading like fire in Southern Rhodesia, many natives are found gathering in Bulawayo, in townships  propagating the four squire gospel of John Graham Lake” The missorama clearly states most of the coordinators of township gatherings were baptised in the Holy Spirit between 1908-1913 through John Graham Lake preaching in South Africa. In the 1917 Missorama publication, a man called Madumejah was on fire for Christ, always seen preaching in the natives townships, and this man was described as a returnee from South Africa. Madumejah had many followers of John Graham Lake gospel of Holy Spirit baptism evidenced by tongues. His major challenge is he was not recognized by Missionaries because he was black, he was expected to work under a white person. And due lack of training most of these gatherings could split in many breakaway sub groups. Issues of polygamy, prophecy and money caused most of the splits as early as 1917. Initially, most apostolic and Zionist movements emerged from this time. The second great breakaway and splits in AFM were experience between 1929-1943. Most of the splits of this time were caused by polygamy issues, prophecy and particular doctrinal teachings. Shona “Manyika’ narrative This narrative is linked to Isaac Chiwaka who came from Manicaland, went to South Africa in 1908, met John Graham Lake and was baptised with the Holy Spirit and later moved to Bulawayo in 1911 and started preaching to railway compound in Bulawayo in 1913 and many converts joined AFM. Chiwaka was liked by white people for preaching the gospel to the ‘indigenous’ community in Bulawayo. A bit of background for Bulawayo is necessary at this stage. The influx of 'foreign' labour saw earlier Shona arrivals (also foreigners to Bulawayo) and non-Rhodesian migrants becoming the 'owners' of Bulawayo, as their presence predated the birth of Ndebele activism. These residents defined the moral, linguistic and social tone of Bulawayo. By 1910, the Bulawayo 'alien' African population had risen to 25,086 from 11,359 in 1906 who included Ndebele, Kalanga and others from Matabeleland were still outnumbered, only increasing from 6,345 in 1906 to 12,739 in 1910. There were of course, apart from Ndebele workers, a few prominent Ndebele inhabitants in town, some of whom were born in the location, such as the Manyobas (including Siphambaniso Manyoba, who became a prominent Ndebele activist after 1929), and others, such as Jojo Mkatjane, originally from the Shangani, who by 1930 appeared to have lost touch with home. There were also remnants of Lobengula's family, such as Queen Moho, who usually housed visitors from the royal family when they came to town; and the children of Muntu (Lobengula's brother), who deserted their father when he became a pauper in Bulilima-Mangwe and went to Bulawayo for 'immorality'. To this number should be added a few local women already living in Bulawayo by 1897, which the Native Commissioner Malema stereotyped as 'prostitutes', whereas some, on the contrary, formed a reasonably prosperous class of women who made money from leasing their properties to urban male workers. By then, Bulawayo had a 'more than adequate' labour provision, with a 'large floating population' wandering between all the principal centres of employment. Early settlers of urban Bulawayo were in different senses both 'cosmopolitan' and 'ethnic'. They interacted freely at workplaces through a created convenient medium of communication, Lapalapa (also called Kitchen Kaffir), which was a mixture of numerous languages and 'broken' English. Lapalapa, viewed by contemporary employers as a language 'adequate for the ordinary purposes of life', was respected as an emergent language that, according to Tudor Trevor, 'spreads from Durban to the Congo, and in almost every kraal someone can be found to understand it'. The first preachers used used lapalapa to convey the gospel in Bulawayo. Isaac Chikawa from Manicaland, a Shona and an employee who had lived in Bulawayo from 1913-1929 is regarded as one key AFM member who came from south Africa with Pentecostal message in Bulawayo in 1913. He was badly injured when there was a tribal fight in December 1929 in Bulawayo. His account is indicated below (Msendo, 2006)...
Read More